The Agency Book

Agency book

Spy in the house. Y.S. Lee. That traitor in Y.

S. Lee's tunnel. There' s a spy in Y.S.Lee's house. Register me to learn more about Young Adult Books. Betrayer in the tunnel author(s):

Spy in the House (The Agency, #1) by Y.S. Lee

As a spy in the house, Mary Quinn shows a lot of charme and comedy. It' 1853 in London, England, and 12-year-old Mary Quinn has just been doomed! At the last minute Mary, condemned for theft, is rescued from the scaffold by a strange man and taken to Miss Scrimshaw's Academy for Misses.

But, just like Maria herself, the Academy is full of mysteries. As a spy in the house, Mary Quinn shows a lot of charme and comedy. It' 1853 in London, England, and 12-year-old Mary Quinn has just been doomed! At the last minute Mary, condemned for theft, is rescued from the scaffold by a strange man and taken to Miss Scrimshaw's Academy for Misses.

But, just like Maria herself, the Academy is full of mysteries. Soon Mary will join a clandestine agency that educates young girls to become investigators and spy officers so that they can work in a community that they stupidly underestimate. Mary now has her first case, infiltrating the house of a wealthy businessman and learning why his freighters keep vanishing.

In a short prolog, in which Maria's hanging is stopped by Anne Treleaven of the Academy, the 1st section immediately leaps 5 years ahead! The first section reveals Anne and Felicity, the 17-year-old Mary's instructors, that her accomplishments at and interaction with the other women have persuaded them that she is a great spy training condition.

And all the experience that Mary has made of who she is is is totally embellished. In the second section of Harry Potter's first novel, just think, he would graduate from Hogwarts, and you now know exactly what it's like to read this book! Whilst Lee gratefully ceases to skip long intervals between sections, there are still storytelling issues when Mary starts her first case.

Mary gets a work as a hostess for Henry's teenage girl Angelica to invade the house of the naval tycoon (and prime suspect) Henry Thorold. Not long before all the persons Mary meets become part of her single role. Since, for example, the stereotypical distorted, spoilt inheritress has died, it would have been great if Angelica had gotten a little more detail at her introduction.....instead she goes on like this immediately.....

However, as the storyline continues, Mary is the only figure who has any true deepness at all, and even that is not very well managed. Mary meets James Easton, the younger sibling of a prospective investor of Henry Thorold. From then on many of the stories are narrated from his point of views (I stupidly, when the flag on the book title of " A Mary Quinn mystery " said, I just thought that Maria would be the celebrity of her own book)!

It is because of this second storytelling part that we always have James, who tells us who Mary is, instead of Mary showing us herself. Commenting as often as Mary is lively and self-contained, it would have been great to see more of her in the spot! However despite these issues, I found myself relishing much of this book (once I got past the really chunky ramp-up part).

Whilst Mary and James quickly become clichéd Rom-Com characters, I cannot ignore the fact that I have often ridiculed the ingenious skirmishes between them. When Maria got the opportunity to glamour, she did so very well. At the best times of the book, Mary reveals herself as a very likeable and lovable person.

The overall puzzle was also a pleasant diversion from the normal thriller-type. Though the secret is sometimes hindered by Lee's inclination to resort to tired old clichés..... an offender even starts a soliloquy that is so trite that even the most kitschy James Bond bad guys would be flush!

A Spy in the House" may be your idea of having a good time if you've just been reading something really hard and want your next book to be flimsy and cuddly.

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