I Write you

I'll write to you

What is the right formal English, "I write to you at the suggestion of" or "I write to you at the recommendation of"? German translation: Both are correct. Broadbane-based copywriters of web content, social media profiles and more for small businesses. Was it grammatically correct to say, "This is the first time I've written you a letter"? There is something wrong with the sentence, but I cannot explain it.

Are the grammatical terms right?

Can it be said correctly from a grammatical point of view: "This is the first case that I have ever sent you a letter"? There is something wrong with the phrase, but I can't tell you why. I' d say:'This is the first book I've ever sent you. Rather than "This is the first that I write you a letter", use "This is the first that I write you a letter" or "This is the first that I write you a letter" or preferably "This is the first that I write you a letter".

I think, "This is the first goddamn thing I've ever done to write you a letter" is technical and grammatical correctly, but it does sound strange. From a technical point of view, it should "write a note to you" instead of "write a note to you", but in English it is common to write[verb][indirect object][direct object] instead of[verb][direct object][preposition][indirect object].

There' s definitely something strange about "first to write ", but "first to write I write" is even more so. I have never ever known that only the verbs directly uponject, pre-, ind objecct sequences are correct. I' ve just had a look up the term "write" in two lexicons. I haven't had her write to me lately.

I haven't had her write to me lately. UK: Write to - I have been writing to my deputy and the local government. US: Write to someone - Chris hasn't been writing to me for a long while. Is it true for me to think that it is more appropriate to write "This is the first writing a note to you" at the end of a note?

I do not think it makes sense to begin a note with this phrase, as the note has not yet been sent. Instead, can I write "I'm starting to write you for the first time" to begin a note? Sounds self-evident to a mother tongue English translator?

However, please be aware that "write to" is not mainly English. Both the" write to" and "write somebody" forms can be used in American English.

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