How to Submit Illustrations to a Publisher

Submit illustrations to a publisher

Submissions will be forwarded directly to our in-house production team, who will review your work. The market size is an important element of publishing. Guidelines for illustrations Is there a different set of guidelines for illustrations for writers, readers and writers? If they use the term illustrations, what do publishing houses mean? Who do I contact if I have a question about illustrations?

Are tables illustrations? So when should I begin to think about the illustrations in the work? And who is in charge of the illustrations?

What is the number of images that will appear in my script? Where does the author know where to place the illustrations in the work? Will I need your consent to use an artwork made by someone else? Where can I get approval for an artwork that has been made or is in the possession of someone else?

There are three major kinds of illustrations my editors talk about - line arts, half-tones and colour-arts. When my artwork is ready, how should I submit my illustrations? I' ve got colour illustrations that will be in b/w. Can I submit transparencies, photos, pictures and originals for use in my work?

What size should my hard copy illustrations be? When I submit paper originals, when will I get them back? Can I copy an image from other publication and submit it for use in my work? When I have paper illustrations that need trimming, will you trim them for me?

I' ve got several hardcopy-illustrations, which have to be mixed and matched to a unique figur. If I want to add words or icons to my hard copy illustrations, what should I do? How high is the default definition for e Illustrations entered for a work? Which programmes and data format should I not use with electronical illustrations?

Which applications can I use to create electronical illustrations? Can I submit my scans? Can I combine several electronical illustrations in a one piece? Can I use a graphic design software to insert text or icons into an artwork? I' d like to put a large number of prints in my books, but most of what I've seen here is over my mind!

Is there a different set of illustration guidelines for writers, publishers and writers? The writer is a person who writes a textbook that does not contain sections that have been authored (contributed) by others. VolumEditor supervises a set of sections that have been authored (contributed) by others (often the VolumEditor also adds sections to the book).

One or more of the sections in a notebook are written by a member of the team. It is very simple for the authors: all they have to do is purchase illustrations and obtain authorisation to use them in accordance with the terms of the agreement. Voluminous writers also purchase illustrations as specified in the agreement, but must allocate portions to each contributing title.

A number of full-page writers just split the number of images in the agreement by the number of sections to calculate the number of images per section. Section collaborators must send illustrations to the partitioneditator. The authors of the section should be informed by the publisher of the tape about the format and dissolution of the computer files, the nature and format of the typeface to be used (which should be standardised for the book) and the number and nature of the illustrations permitted in the section.

If they use the term illustrations, what do publishing houses mean? When used by an illustrator, an image is a graphical item that contains photos, graphics, diagrams, cards, and illustrations. Who do I contact if I have a question about illustrations? Are tables illustrations? No. A spreadsheet is not an example.

Part of the "text" of the script is a spreadsheet. Rarely, a spreadsheet may contain items that are illustrations. If this is the case, the chart is a mixture of text and illustrations. If a spreadsheet contains illustrations, you must discuss the correct layout with your editors. Usually the writer provides an electronical data set with the spreadsheet and its images as well as extra files: only one data set of the spreadsheet (usually created in MSWord) plus one data set for each image that will contain the spreadsheet.

In the case of complicated charts with many figures, your editors must be consulted carefully. Every spreadsheet should be filed as a seperate electronical document that is not part of your master text data (manuscript files). So when should I begin to think about the illustrations in the work? You should decide in advance which images your script needs and how to obtain them.

Only insert illustrations that make a valuable addition and help enhance the content of your work. Unnecessary illustrations can divert rather than help the readers and raise the costs, lead times and prices of your work. The illustrations should be created from both an aesthetic and a technological point of view.

Should you be unacquainted with general artistic genres or unsure which is the most appropriate for your work, your author will be happy to refer you to examples in other works (or from other sources) that may help you visualise the type of illustration best suited to your work.

And who is in charge of the illustrations? With the exception of exceptional cases (e.g. promotion of illustrations), the authors are liable for all illustrations and approval documents and to ensure that the illustrations meet the publication standard. The conditions for illustrations are set out in your booking document.

What is the number of images that will appear in my script? Your booking agreement determines the number of illustrations (and often the type of illustrations) that will appear in your work. It is an approach, and as a general principle, publishing houses allow writers to have 5% of the number stated in the agreement.

When you think that your number of illustrations differs by more than 5% from the number in the agreement, you should immediately consult your publisher. Where does the author know where to place the illustrations in the work? In your script, you must indicate the estimated position for each image.

Use the following conventions to encode your manuscript: The name of your image file should be as shown above. Will I need your consent to use an artwork made by someone else? The majority of the images are copyrighted. U.S. Copyrights says you're getting better and better at getting approval, and so are you.

It may, however, be necessary to obtain a permit for a particular work (e.g. illustrations made before 1923 are generally "in the open domain" and may be used without a permit). When you receive a license, you should do so because copyrights are often hard to understand.

If, for any particular reasons, you cannot obtain authorization, you should ascertain what the laws require under the circumstances and also contact your copywriter, who is somewhat acquainted with it. Sometimes it may be necessary to seek the advice of a legal counsel to ascertain whether an image falls under the scope of copyrights.

Authors are responsible for ensuring that the illustrations they submit are enclosed with a duly completed approval document, unless approval is not required. Your editors will, however, carry out an impartial evaluation of this need and may let you know that you need approval for one or more illustrations.

Where can I get approval for an artwork that has been made or is in the possession of someone else? To do this, you must submit a completed copy of the copyright notice provided by your illustrator to the copyright owner and then sign and submit a copy of the copyright notice to your illustrator. Generally, publishers favour that all necessary approval documents are presented to the press at once and not separately, as they are purchased.

Generally, the owner of the copyright is the individual who produced the artwork (artist, photographer, etc.) or the agents of this individual. There are three major kinds of illustrations my editors talk about: line arts, half-tones and colour-arts. There are three different kinds of illustrations used in books: line arts, half-tones and colouring.

Lineage is every artwork that has only jetty, without shades of grey or shading. Easy-to-navigate line art illustrations; foreign details will destroy the importance and value of the arts. Drawings should be drawn with clear, well-defined contours of either monochrome or text on plain, blank commercial grade or cardboard.

Half-tones are all images that show only grayscale shades of grey (no other colours). Colour artwork is any artwork with a series of colours that can be produced using four-colour printing colours. Colour photos, colour diagrams, colour charts and colour sketches are just a few of the colour work. Hybride artwork should be made with Adobe Illustrator or another popular graphics software that allows you to create and preserve the artwork with "layers".

" As your illustrations become more complicated, you should use the service of a professional illustrator (usually at the author's expense). A contract with your own illustrator can lead to high-quality illustrations for your text. When my artwork is ready, how should I submit my illustrations?

Nowadays more and more writers are submitting their illustrations electronically. In this case, the writer must submit "high-resolution files" in the "correct format" (discussed elsewhere). A number of writers still submit hard copies of illustrations - among them photos, transparencies (film positives), hardcards and originals and paintings. Images in either hard copy or electronically are permitted, unless your agreement provides for a different size.

The illustrations must, however, be "acceptable" to the publisher, which your editors must decide. As an example, an image that is below the standard resolutions or in an incorrect size (e.g. PowerPoint images do not work) or a photo with a scratches cannot be accepted. I' ve got a colour image that' s going to be in b/w.

Can I submit transparencies, photos, pictures and originals for use in my work? If not expressly desired otherwise, you can submit your illustrations in any form appropriate for publishing. Illustrations by publishing houses have historically been taken up as pictures or sketches. Publishing houses today are receiving much more frequently digital data from writers.

There were both good and bad things about this amendment for publishing houses. Reception of digital data can help a publisher reduce costs and saves a lot of valuable resources, but only if the digital data meets the strict requirements of the publishing houses. So if you have transparencies, photos, paintings as well as originals, you should let your editors know, as they may want you to submit them for review instead of submitting them electronically.

What should my hard copy illustrations be? Your hard copy illustrations should at least be as large as they will be in the work. They should be 150% of the amount you would like them to appear in the text. When I submit paper originals, will I get them back?

Yes, all images will be restored. It is however common that the illustrations are kept for up to 60 workingdays after publication of the work. If we get genuine images, we login them into our recordings and save them with due care. Illustrations are often sent to the letterpress operator, where they are printed on costly scanner equipment and then stored if the documents need to be compared with the test print.

Therefore, the press operator must send the illustrations back to us before we can send them back to you. If we get the illustrations from the printers, we verify them to make sure that all parts are in order. You will then be sent the illustrations back to you. Can I copy an image from other publication and submit it for use in my work?

When you have or do not need authorizations (e.g. the image is publicly accessible), you must consider the effects of copying on the image qualitiy. For example, most half-tones and colour prints you publish have a monitor (if you view a photo at 10x enlargement, you see the screen) and are therefore not eligible for re-use as your own scan or photocopy (even if you are copied in Graphics mode).

However, Line Type can sometimes be copied; however, you often need to clear your frequently copied or copied Line Type pictures with a tool like Adobe Illustrator (so it is better to start scanning first). Though seldom, there are cases where an artwork has to be copied, e.g. when working at a distant place with an elusive picture and you don't have a high-resolution scanning device at your disposal.

It is preferable for the author not to use the illustrations in combination, especially if the definitive character is a mixture of line and halftone work. How do I insert words or icons into my hard copy illustrations? Instead, ask a graphics artist to generate an eFile with a seperate level that contains the words or icons (at 1200 dots per inch or as a vectors file).

So if you only have one or two such illustrations, speak to your journalist as he or she may be able to commission the publisher to help you. How high is the default definition for e Illustrations entered for a work? Electronical copies of Line Type (black only) must be 1200 dots per inch (also referred to as ppi) when the artwork is presented in the estimated sizes it is likely to appear in the text.

Photos, pictures and drawings with a pen ( "coloured or grey pencils") can be 300 dots per inch (in the anticipated format in the book), provided they do not contain line arts items (e.g. text, numbers, darts, etc.). If you submit electronical illustrations that contain a mixture of line and non-line illustrations, you should work with a piece of application that can overlay the illustrations, either with a vector-based application that generates planes, or with a raster-based application that can store line artwork in one plane (at 1200 dpi) and the non-line artwork part in another plane (at 300 dpi).

Graphics vector-based applications like Adobe Illustrator are perfect for the combination of different kinds of illustrations. Which programmes and data format should I not use with electronical illustrations? It' not possible to include here all the unacceptable data files, but it may be useful to include the most popular applications and files that are generally not suitable for printing to.

PowerPoint (ppt files) and Microsoft Excel are the most frequently refused types of graphic. It is a favorite presentation tool, but not at all suited for the publication of books. Occasionally, hard copy copies of Microsoft Word line artwork can be accepted, but most MSword and other word processing file formats are not appropriate for submission of illustrations.

The.if extension is. is almost always useless. Which applications can I use to produce my illustrations electronically? However if the artwork is just a photo without line artwork, then you can use many graphic applications that use a high-resolution. or. fif or. jump image as long as the ultimate image quality is 300 dots per inch at a 1.5 x what you are expecting the print to be.

When illustrating line arts, it is best to work in a vector-based application like Adobe Illustrator. Can I submit my scans? As an example, colour or halftone scans from a textbook usually do not work because the artwork has a monitor and the monitor is horribly distorted when the letterpress operator tries to scan the artwork a second scan.

To see the display, look at an artwork in a 10x magnifier such as a jewelry bow. The majority of publishing houses would rather have the source illustrations than a scanner, but this is not always possible. So, when you' re doing the scanner, be sure to run a high-resolution scanner and make sure that the scanner is clear and the colours are the same as the originals.

If you are going to do a lot of illustrations, try an exercise scanner and submit it to your publisher for proof. Can I combine several electronical illustrations in a one piece? Every part of the artwork should be a seperate plane and either a vector-based artwork or the corresponding solution for the visual.

Make a design of a combination of illustrations and submit it to your editors for review. Can I use a graphic design software to include text or icons in an artwork? Usually, when generating these composite images, you should make sure you submit the applications files (for example, an Adobe illustrator document instead of a.tif document created from Adobe illustrator).

I' d like to put a large number of prints in my books, but most of what I've seen here is over my mind!

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