Anyone can be a Writer

Anybody can be a writer.

Everyone can compose, but not everyone can be a novelist. Everyone can compose, but not everyone can be a novelist, just as anyone with a little cash can take or ride a horse, but a recording contract or participation in the World Equestrian Games takes years of practice, as well as gear and travelling (not to speak of talent). As far as the written word is concerned, there is some balance in primary schooling in the system of government but not everyone can allow themselves to go to school. You will need publishing loans to be able to apply for a scholarship from local, state, or state art councillors in Canada. Courses where you can see journalists, publisher and other authors often take place in narrow city centre pubs in the evening and are hard to visit if you have problems with your transportation, work very early or very long, don't need to work, don't need to be drunk, go to the local community or organise child care.

In order to be close to all these activities, you will probably have to move from your local area, First Nations Reservation or a tranquil location to a large urban area where you will be paying one of the highest rents in the land that no emergent writer's allowance could ever provide (source location for rental costs).

In many cases, even posts for relatively non-sexy publisher jobs (e.g. academic research assistants at a campus press) require a publisher certification or equal exposure, and good fortune in payment for an extra academic year or $500/month work placement if you have students' debts or health care spending.

To be a novelist (as distinct from the cultivation of a habitual way of writing) means to play with your destiny, even for a young post-graduate with no debts, no addicts and no handicaps - the creme (no wordplay intended) of the harvest of privileges. For every author who also has a medical, legal or professorial background, I know twenty who work as treasurers, barista, dog handlers, server, part-time teachers or through a mixture of these and free-lance work.

In the latter group, many are not able to put aside enough funds for pension or emergencies, and like many precarious Canadians, they are particularly susceptible to abuses in the work place and employer who do not or do not afford to do so. TWUC (Writers' Union of Canada) provides its members with support in drafting agreements and complaints and the opportunity to take part in a group healthcare program, but only authors who have written a textbook are considered for members.

Whilst the overwhelming bulk of Canada's authors have long since ceased to live on subsidies, advance loans, bonuses and payment from programmes such as the public lending right, today authors also face a labour force characterised by unparalleled volatility. Statistics Canada reports that the number of temps "rose sharply from 1997 to 2005 in the shape of contracts of employment, seasons or occasional jobs" (source: Link).

In a 2014 Statistics Canada survey, the mean wages in Canada between 1975 and 2013 had risen by only $0.01 in actual terms and the proportion of young employees (aged 15-19) who earn a living has risen from 30% in 2003 to 45% in 2010 (source: Link). Meanwhile, the mean costs of a two-room flat in Canada between 1992 and 2015 have risen by over 65%, according to the Mayan Mortgage and Housing Corporation (SourceLink; Note: I have this figure by division of the 2015 cancer mean by the 1992 mean).

The advocacy of more art financing and membership of trade union organisations with little influence is not nearly enough to arm potential authors for the present world. There is a need for the broader demand for and encouragement from Canada's authors and the organisations working on their behalf towards inclusive, multi-purpose schemes such as primary care, pharmacy and child care.

For suggestions and feasibility study on such programmes see Hugh Segal's former Senator's Find a Better Way, the Canadian Medical Association's National Pharmacare in Canada and Pierre Fortin, Luc Godbout and Suzie St-Cerny's Impact of Quebec's Low-Fee Childcare Program on Female Labour Force Participation, Domestic Income, and Government Budgets.

While the increase in scholarships would primarily help those who already had the means to accumulate work and request financing, the provision of nutrition, housing, accessible child care and prevention of monetary bankruptcy in the case of a life-changing health care diagnose would go much further to enable the most marginalised members of the community to continue their training, as well as the creation and consume of books.

Dismantling these most fundamental and unaffordable entrance obstacles would eventually increase the variety in the literature and publication industries, making the contents and bricks and mortar in our papers and journals more prestigious and pertinent to the Indian population. She has published Bardia Sinaees poetry throughout Canada, among them Maisonneuve, The Walrus and Best Canada Poetry in English (Tightrope Books).

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