African Writers

Writers from Africa

Authors like Nnedi Okorafor and Sofia Samatar are lighthouses for young Africans. Contemporary African literature is moving at a rapid pace; both stylistically and sonically more defiant than that of the great generation of independent writers. A useful link is available at http://www.geocities.

com/africanwriters/. Interest in books by African authors is growing. Many of these authors have grown up or spent their first adult years outside Africa.

American Writers' Club - Art, Literary and Performing Arts| British Library

More than 250 hour programs were filmed in the Transcription Centre, London, under the direction of Dennis Dürden in the sixties. Ribbons were redistributed for broadcasting by African and other broadcasters. Included in the compilation is footage made by BBC Broadcasting. More than 250 hour programs were filmed in the Transcription Centre, London, under the direction of Dennis Dürden in the sixties.

Ribbons were redistributed for broadcasting by African and other broadcasters. Included in the compilation is footage made by BBC Broadcasting. Included in the compilation are: pieces of musical work. Any recording on this site is subject to license agreement.

Africans Writers Series - Marketing Site

Heinemann has been publishing the most important essays of contemporary African literary works in his African Writers Series for over 40 years. Included in this on-line issue are over 250 books of literary, lyric, drama and nonfictional essays, among them works by Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Steve Biko, Buchi Emecheta, Nadine Gordimer, Bessie Head, Doris Lessing, Nelson Mandela, Dambudzo Marechera, Christopher Okigbo, Okot p'Bitek and Tayeb Salih.

Canadian Writers Series

It encompasses the entire historic spectrum of contemporary African literature, from early pioneer novelists of African writers such as René Marans Batouala (1921; AWS 1973 ), Sol Plaatjes Mhudi (1930; AWS, 1978), Peter Abrahams' Mine Boy (1946; AWS 1963) and Achebe's own Things Case Apart (AWS No.

1, 1962), later masterworks such as Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North (1969), Bessie Head's A Question of Power (1974) and Dambudzo Marechera's The House of Hunger (1978), up to the last two books of the work: Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North: Besides the fictional narrative, the library contains some of the most important works of African lyricism, among them Christopher Okigbo's Labyrinthe (1976), Okot p'Bitek's Song of Lawino, which was described as the most important African poet of the 1960', the works of Dennis Brutus, Taban lo Liyong and Jack Mapanje and Mazisi Kunene's epiphany about the ascent of the Zulu-emperium, Emperor Shaka the Great (1979).

Detailed information on the works currently in the library can be found in the literature. Most of the works in the series come from English-speaking regions in West, South and East Africa, but also from French, Portuguese, Zulu, Swahili, Acoli, Sesotho, Afrikaans, Luganda and Arabic.

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